Using Vega Wallet

Wallets to use with Vega

Vega has a self-hosted, local wallet. To use it follow the instructions in the Create a Vega Wallet guide on Vega’s new documentation site.

Using this wallet, your keys will be completely disassociated from your personal identity, and we will have no way to connect them, unless you share your public key for any reason.

For Fairground, Vega has also hosted a version of the wallet server, to make it easier to quickly start trading. A hosted wallet service is a website that manages wallet access for multiple users. Each user only has access to their own wallets. Wallet files are stored remotely, not on your computer, and access is only possible via the website.

Note: Even though this is a testnet, you should never share your private keys, or your wallet passphrase.

Whether you use the Vega-hosted wallet server, or the self-hosted wallet, the Vega network doesn’t know about the Vega wallet server, or anything about your login information locally, or your personal information. All it sees is the public key and cryptographic signature that comes along with the transaction. That’s enough for it to know that the correct person has the authority to manage collateral, place orders, request withdrawal, or vote on governance actions.

Learn more about depositing collateral with your public key on the deposits page.

You’ll also need an Ethereum wallet that can connect to the Ropsten Ethereum network to hold collateral outside of Vega, including Ropsten Ethereum to pay gas.

Should I be setting up my own wallet to use Vega Fairground?

It’s recommended that you set up your own wallet and stop using the Vega-hosted wallet credentials, but you’re welcome to keep using them if you find them easier to interact with.

Right now, if you attempt to connect your self-hosted, local wallet (on http://localhost:1789/) directly to the hosted Console on https://console.fairground.wtf, you’ll run into cross-site security issues, and won’t be able to connect. We’ve added a feature to the Wallet that allows you to get around this. If you’re using the Vega-hosted wallet, then you can still successfully use https://console.fairground.wtf.

Building a web-based wallet is in progress, and that will make the process smoother.

Is there an API reference for the Vega Wallet service?

We have a full REST API reference for interacting with both Vega-hosted and self-hosted, local Vega wallets.